Agility

Agility is fast moving, challenging and energetic activity enjoyed immensely by dogs and handlers alike. It’s also a great spectator sport. Dogs work off lead and are guided by the signals and voice commands of their handlers. They speed around an intricate course over or through a variety of obstacles, including jumps, tunnels, weave poles, even a teeter totter and must complete the course cleanly, within the time allowed. Agility is open to all breeds, and since dogs are grouped according to size, with appropriate jump height and speed requirements for each size range, every dog has the same chance to excel, whether he’s short and stocky or tall and lean.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Agility

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Chase / Sprinters

CKC is pleased to introduce the new Chase Ability Program to the CKC line of events, effective March 1, 2016.

This exciting event, developed after the ever-popular Lure Coursing, allows dogs to uncover their natural prey drive through chasing a lure – all while having lots of fun. The Chase Ability Program also provides purebreds and mixed-breeds with the opportunity to compete and earn multiple titles and certificates in a field event that all dogs are capable of performing.

Two types of courses will be available: one for dogs shorter than 12 inches at the withers or brachycephalic dogs and another course for the remainder of the dogs entered. The Chase Ability Program is a pass/fail event. How does a Dog earn a Pass? A dog must run alone, chasing the lure and complete the course with enthusiasm and without interruption.

Any CKC-recognized Club approved to hold Lure Coursing Trials is automatically approved to hold a Chase Ability event. Applications are to be made a minimum of 180 days prior to the event.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Chase-Ability-Program

Sprinter is a fun event open to all dogs to enjoy the challenge of running a 100-meter dash. All dogs entered will receive a handicap score based on their height, and their time to finish will be converted to kilometres per hour. Titles are awarded upon the dog accumulating a given number of points.

CKC Recognized Lure Coursing Clubs are approved to hold Sprinter Events. All other CKC Recognized clubs that are interested and have the resources available may apply to shows & trials to host the event. They must have the equipment, experienced lure coursing operators and the proper location to hold a safe event.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Sprinter

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Draft Dog Tests

Originally developed to show off the traditional carting and weight-pulling skills of the heavier breeds such as Newfoundlands and Bernese Mountain Dogs, draft-dog competitions are now open to all breeds. The test begins with some basic obedience exercises, then the dog is harnessed and hitched to a cart or wagon and taken by his handler through a series of manoeuvres designed to demonstrate his usefulness in hauling a wheeled vehicle safely and quietly over smooth terrain.

The dog is also asked to pull a freight load over rougher terrain, which includes natural obstacles, and at the advanced level, backpacking exercises are added to the mix of required skills.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Draft-Dog-Tests

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Herding

Dogs have been used for centuries to gather and herd all kinds of livestock – the large number and variety of herding and droving breeds in existence today attest to the importance of their work. Herding tests and trials, open to all breeds, require dogs to move a group of animals (ducks, sheep or cattle are the livestock commonly used) through a designated course of gates and into a pen, guided by the commands of their handlers. The dogs must be forceful enough to gain the respect of the stock and maintain control, yet quiet enough not to panic or scatter the herd.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Herding-Trials

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IPO For Giant Schnauzer

IPO is an acronym for “International Prüfungsordnung”, a German name meaning “International Utility Dog Trial”, formerly also known as “Schutzhund” (“protection dog” in German). Schutzhund evolved over 110 years ago in Europe as a way of testing German Shepherd dogs for their suitability for use in breeding programs.

IPO today is a sport that all working breeds train and compete in, and is a sport regulated by the FCI – Utility Dog commission (http://www.fci.be/en/Utility-Dogs-58.html).

There are three phases of the sport: tracking, obedience, and protection. Each phase is scored out of a possible 100 points, with a minimum passing score of 70. There are three levels in IPO (IPO 1-3), and each level increases in difficulty.

IPO Tracking

assesses the dog’s ability to follow the scent in a precise manner and also tests mental and physical endurance.

IPO Obedience

assesses the dog’s willingness to work with the handler in a free, happy, powerful, attentive, and precise manner and also tests the dog’s agility and temperament.

IPO Protection

asses the dog’s ability to follow directions to search and confront an unknown man – the “helper” – while under total control of the handler.

Useful links for IPO organizations with clubs in Canada:

American Working Malinois Association: www.workingmalinois.org
German Shepherd Schutzhund Club of Canada: www.gsscc.ca
DVG America: http://dvg-america.com

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Obedience

Obedience trials were designed to test the dog’s suitability as a good companion. Basic tests include heeling (on and off lead), Sit, Stand, Stay and coming when called. At more advanced levels, dogs are asked to jump, retrieve, respond to signals, and identify and retrieve articles carrying their handlers’ scent.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Obedience-Trials

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Rally

CKC Rally is a companion sport to CKC Obedience. Both events require teamwork between dog and handler, along with similar performance skills. Rally provides an excellent introduction to all CKC companion performance events for dogs and handlers. The chief objective of rally is to provide a fast-moving and motivational activity that demonstrates the competency of handler and dog in performing basic obedience exercises without requiring exact precision for success. Rally can also provide the opportunity to refine training skills for competitors in other events.

Dogs in rally obedience events should demonstrate willingness and enjoyment. To that end, handlers may use praise, encouragement, and petting throughout a rally course.

The Obedience Trial Rules and Regulations, where applicable, shall govern the conduct of CKC Rally trials and shall apply to all persons and dogs participating in them, except as these Rally Obedience Trial Rules and Regulations may otherwise provide.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Rally-Obedience-Trials

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Scent Detection

A fun event open to all dogs to enjoy the challenge of locating a scent and communicating with their handler that the scent has been located. The trial is done in a variety of environments allowing a dog to use their strongest natural sense.

Learn more in our blog, “Scent Detection: Put Your Dog’s Nose to the Test.”

How it Works:
There are five classes, starting with the entry-level “instinct” class, and in ascending order the novice, open, excellent, and master classes. Each class tests the dog’s ability at a new, more challenging level, encouraging greater perseverance and focus on fine-tuning of olfactory senses. The scent source may be within a container – the only option for the instinct level – interior of a building, or exterior – the great outdoors!

Dogs will be divided into height divisions within the classes based on the height indicated on the entry form. Titles are awarded upon the dog acquiring the required number of qualifying scores within the class entered.

How to Get Started:
You can start by watching a demo test in our Scent Detection Videos, but the best way to learn about dog sports is to try it for yourself! Join a Scent Detection Sanction Match – a friendly competition for any one to come and learn how to take part. Try it out at at any of the locations below. Signing up for a Sanction Match is easy – in most cases all you have to do is show up on event day! Contact the host club for full registration and event details.

https://www.ckc.ca/en/Events/Overview-of-Events/Scent-Detection

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